The Story of Saint EOM and Pasaquan

The Life and Times of a New York Drag Queen Turned Pasaquan Saint

Whenever he needed supplies, Eddie Owens Martin would dress up in drag queen regalia, open the doors of his beat-up old station wagon, and call his cats. Dozens would emerge from every corner of the yard and hop in for the short ride to Buena Vista, Georgia. In town, the cats would scatter to the four directions until Martin had finished his business. Once again he would call for the cats, who dutifully hopped in for the return journey.

Martin, who was better known as Saint EOM by then, had spent most of his youth wandering the streets of New York City. He made pocket change by telling fortunes, painting portraits of his fellow drag queens, and working as a con artist. Without the high fever that gripped him one cold winter day, he might have died on the streets, unknown and bound for a pauper’s grave.

In his delirium, Martin was visited by a tall being from another world. The alien introduced himself as a Pasaquan and told Martin to change his ways or he would die. He also instructed him to return to his childhood home in Georgia and build a place to honor the Pasaquan race.

The late 19th century farmhouse in Buena Vista, Georgia, that St. EOM turned into one of the most astounding creative art projects in the world

The late 19th century farmhouse in Buena Vista, Georgia, that St. EOM turned into one of the most astounding creative art projects in the world

Martin changed his name to St. EOM and, around 1955, moved into the Buena Vista house left to him by his late mother. For the next 30+ years, using bricks and stones from the site, he created a complex of six major structures connected by a series of painted masonry walls, colorful concrete sculptures, and an assortment of landscape elements.

One of many sculptures of the aliens who directed Eddie Owens Martin to create the site known as Pasaquan in Buena Vista, Georgia

One of many sculptures of the aliens who directed Eddie Owens Martin to create the site known as Pasaquan in Buena Vista, Georgia

When he wasn’t building or painting, St. EOM continued to tell fortunes. One of the more spectacular stories from those days involves three Vietnam War veterans who drove up to the house. Two asked to have their fortunes told but the third man said he wasn’t interested and remained in the car. Upon leaving, St. EOM handed one of the men a slip of paper for the third man. On it he had written, “You have no future.” According to the legend, shortly after driving off they crashed and the third man was killed.

St. EOM often talked about the screen in the back of his head where he saw his visions. He was told that the word Pasaquan was a combination of the Spanish verb pasar (to happen) and quan, which means the future in some Oriental language. Pasaquan, therefore, was a place where in the future, all races, colors, sexes, and creeds would come together to live peacefully.

Representations of the tall aliens with whom St. EOM communicated flank an entrance to Pasaquan

Representations of the tall aliens with whom St. EOM communicated flank an entrance to Pasaquan

Martin did his utmost to bring that vision to reality within the walls of the house he called Pasaquan. Nearly every inch of the stone walls and buildings were painted with murals that represented the world he envisioned. Eerie sculptures of the alien Pasaquans stand sentinel at entrances to the compound, always levitating slightly above the ground. Each morning, EOM would dance in the giant sandpit that stood in the center of the compound – some say entirely naked – and then meditate. At end of day, he did the same dance in reverse. Many locals claim it was a rain dance because he made it rain.

The sand pit where St. EOM danced naked every morning before meditating

The sand pit where St. EOM danced naked every morning before meditating

Inside the original 1880’s farmhouse he created a “Reverberation room,” with a giant mandala painted on the wall. St. EOM could make the mandala rotate by concentrating on the spirals. The “Sanctuary” room showed the way to your destination, but it couldn’t be reached in a straight line. Indeed, from a window caved into the wall of an adjacent room I could see a paradisaical scene, but to get to it I had to follow a circular path into the room.

The mandala in the farmhouse that St. EOM claimed to be able to make rotate simply by focusing on its spirals

The mandala in the farmhouse that St. EOM claimed to be able to make rotate simply by focusing on its spirals

The Sanctuary, a room in St.. EOM's farmhouse that showed people "the way to their destination"

The Sanctuary, a room in St.. EOM’s farmhouse that showed people “the way to their destination”

The artist shot and killed himself in 1986. Over time, Pasaquan’s walls crumbled and paintings faded in the Georgia heat and humidity. Fortunately, residents of Buena Vista, who had come to accept the eccentric St. EOM over the years, formed the Pasaquan Preservation Society to rescue the seven-acre property. Today Pasaquan is undergoing a complete renovation courtesy of The Kohler Foundation. Pasaquan was subsequently gifted to Columbus State University (CSU), which appointed Professor Mike McFalls in the University’s Department of Art to oversee the completion of the site. Although not yet officially open, visitors are welcome to drop by during the week to watch the artists at work.

Professor Mike McFalls from Columbus State University, discusses the life and times of Eddie Owens Martin, later known as St. EOM

Professor Mike McFalls from Columbus State University, discusses the life and times of Eddie Owens Martin, later known as St. EOM

A grand opening is planned for for the site in October of this year. In life, Eddie Owens Martin was a guru with few followers. In death, he may finally achieve the recognition he sought when Pasaquan is finally unveiled to the world at large.

St. EOM's portrait of the alien Pasaquan, whom he claimed communicated with him throughout his latter years. They are shown wearing pressure suits, the buttons of which controlled their ability to levitate.

St. EOM’s portrait of the alien Pasaquan, whom he claimed communicated with him throughout his latter years. They are shown wearing pressure suits, the buttons of which controlled their ability to levitate.

Author’s disclosure: I was a guest of ExploreGeorgia.org during my Georgia tour. However, the receipt and acceptance of complimentary items or services will never influence the content, topics, or posts in this blog. I write the truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the truth.

10 Comments on “The Life and Times of a New York Drag Queen Turned Pasaquan Saint

  1. Hi Barbara, Enjoyed your article. I am from Buena Vista, GA and live here still. I remember stories of Eddie Martin (St. EOM) told to me by my parents when I was a kid. All Southern towns have a local eccentric but we won the lottery. I am very thankful for the work of the Kohler foundation and the restoration brings the place to life in a way that I don’t remember it in my lifetime. For your readers, if you enjoy American Folk art or any technicolor expression of creativity, please come for a visit. Can’t imagine that this place could disappoint.

    • Hi Dan: Visiting Pasaquan was one of the highlights of my tour around Georgia, and I think when it opens this fall it will be not only a great accomplishment (the restoration), but also a boon to your home town. Wish I could be there for the grand opening, but I’m so grateful that I got to see it in the restorative phase. Thanks so much for taking the time to comment!

  2. Hi, I love your blog but never subscribed. I just replaced one of the four you lost. Keep up the good work!

    • I think it’s going to be spectacular when they finish the restoration, Sandra!

  3. I love outsider art and very much enjoyed your article. Thanks for thoroughly covering St EOM\’s story.

    • Hi Regina: Glad you enjoyed it. It’s really interesting how people react to these types of articles. I never said whether or not I believed Eddie Martin could tell fortunes or what I thought of him, but I lost four subscribers almost immediately after the weekly newsletter went out. I’m with yo – I’m always intrigued by people who are “different.”

      • My goodness I can\’t believe that you lost subscribers over this! I could wax all philosophical and say that millions believe all sorts of myths, but I\’ll just say I loved this piece. It was fascinating, I love it as art, and I\’d glad it\’s being restored and not left to rot. Whatever it may or may not be it has a very happy, colorful vibe 🙂

        • I couldn’t agree more, Linda. I choose to look at it as art, and a celebration of how people are (thankfully) different. But to each his own, I guess.

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