Acid Lakes and Sulfur Deposits of Dallol, in Northeast Ethiopia

PHOTO: Hydro-Geothermal Deposits of Dallol, in Northeast Ethiopia

Dallol, officially one of the remotest places on earth, is located in the Danakil Depression in northeast Ethiopia. It is known for its otherworldly hydro-geothermal features that include acidic sulfur lakes, geysers, and bizarrely colored mineral deposits.

Dallol, officially one of the remotest places on earth, is located in the Danakil Depression in northeast Ethiopia. The area is known for its otherworldly hydro-geothermal features that include acidic sulfur lakes, geysers, and bizarrely colored mineral deposits. Though technically listed as a settlement by the government, Dallol is no longer inhabited. Other than nomadic peoples who mine salt and run camel caravans in the area, the only residents in this nearly uninhabitable landscape live in the nearby community of Hamedela, which serves as a base for tourists visiting the country’s volcanic regions.

Sitting more than 400 feet below sea level, Dallol claims to be the hottest place on Earth. That claim is sometimes contested by those who insist Death Valley, California is hotter. However, Dallol holds the official record for the highest average temperature for an inhabited location; an average annual temperature of 35°C (95°F) was recorded between 1960 and 1966. Aside from tourism, the area is important as a mining center for Potash and salt.

One Comment on “PHOTO: Hydro-Geothermal Deposits of Dallol, in Northeast Ethiopia

  1. Ethiopia is the main nation within Africa that was never formally colonized; in any case, it needed to overcome Italian forces twice to stay free. The soonest occasion of human precursors utilizing instruments has been followed to Ethiopia.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *