Hole in the Donut Cultural Travel
Narodni Trg (People's Square), in the old town area of Split, Croatia

Click on title to view photo in large format: Narodni Trg (People’s Square) is the main gathering place for residents of Split, Croatia. Prior to its construction in the 14th century, the main square of the city was the Peristyle, located inside Diocletian’s Palace. As the city expanded, it became evident the Peristyle could no longer accommodate the growing population, thus this new square just to the west of the palace compound was constructed. Today Narodni Trg is Read More

The harbor, Riva, and Old Town of Split, Croatia

Click on title to view photo in large format: A bird’s-eye view of the harbor and Old Town of Split, Croatia, taken from the hilltop Cafe Bar Vidilica in Marjan Park. The tree-lined seaside promenade in the foreground, known as the Riva, is a favorite spot for sipping coffee, wine, or soft drinks at one its many cafes. Read More

Two of the most interesting structures in Bihac, Bosnia-Herzegovina: an uncommon octagonal style

Click on title of post to view photo in large format: The city of Bihac, located in far northwest Bosnia-Herzegovina, is home to several unusual historic buildings, including this octagonal “Turbe” (Ottoman mausoleum) and the square Captain’s Tower. The latter is one of the oldest buildings in town and today houses the Regional Museum. Though it is unknown exactly when the Captain’s Tower was built, it was mentioned as early as Read More

I trampled a few roses before learning why the streets and sidewalks of Sarajevo were covered with red splotches. During the Bosnian War, an average of 329 mortar shells rained down on the city every day for more than 3.5 years, leaving a moonscape of craters. After the war ended in 1995, these holes were filled with red resin. With the unique sense of humor that had allowed Sarajevans to survive the longest siege in the history of modern warfare, residents of the city dubbed these floral-shaped memorials Sarajevo Roses. Once I knew the story, I trod more respectfully.

One of many Sarajevo Roses found throughout the city. These craters from mortar shells were filled with red resin after the war.

One of many Sarajevo Roses found throughout the city. These craters lest over from mortar shells were filled with red resin after the war.

The Bosnian War erupted as a result of the breakup of the former Yugoslavia. Unlike ethnically homogeneous regions such as Slovenia and Croatia, both of which had successfully seceded from Yugoslavia by 1991, Bosnia-Herzegovina was home to Catholic Croats, Orthodox Christian Serbs, and Bosnian Moslems. Bosnia’s declaration of independence in 1992 infuriated Bosnian Serbs, who preferred to maintain allegiance with neighboring Serbia. On April 6, 1992, with the support of military forces from Serbia, they began seizing areas of Bosnia predominantly occupied by ethnic Serbs. Read More

The Una River in Bihac, Bosnia-Herzegovina. Bihac is popular with tourists who are visiting Una National Park, located just a few kilometers from the city. The upper river has some spectacular waterfalls, and whitewater rafting trips are a popular activity in the park.

Click on title of post to view photo in large format: The Una River in Bihac, Bosnia-Herzegovina. Bihac is popular with tourists who are visiting Una National Park, located just a few kilometers from the city. There are spectacular waterfalls along the upper course of the river, located just a few kilometers from Bihac. The river is also known for whitewater rafting trips and for Read More

Eternal Flame in Sarajevo, Bosnia-Herzegovina, is a memorial to the military and civilian victims of the Second World War

Click on title of post to view photo in large format: The Eternal flame in Sarajevo, Bosnia-Herzegovina, is a memorial to the military and civilian victims of World War Two. The monument was dedicated in April, 1946, following the liberation of the city from Nazi occupation. The inscription reads: “With courage and the jointly spilled blood of the fighters of the Bosnian Herzegovinian, Croatian, Montenegrin, and Serbian Brigades of the glorious Yugoslav National Army; with the joint efforts and sacrifices of Sarajevan patriots, Serbs, Muslims and Croats on the 6th of April 1945 Sarajevo, the capital city of the People’s Republic of Bosnia and Herzegovina was liberated. Eternal glory and gratitude to the fallen heroes of the liberation of Sarajevo and our homeland, on the first anniversary of its liberation – a grateful SarajevoRead More