Hole in the Donut Cultural Travel
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Another day, another tour. This time I have come to the Blue Lagoon on the tiny island of Comino, famous for its clear turquoise waters. Frankly, I am bored out of my mind. Though others are swimming amongst clumps of jellyfish that are fading from royal blue to blue-gray as they die and wash up on the postage stamp beach, the water is too cold for me.

View of the Blue Hole from the cliff -top trail

View of the Blue Hole from the cliff -top trail

An hour after completing an hour hike along the cliff tops, I have commandeered the only patch of shade in sight, to sit and write while I await the return of my boat back to Malta. Trash is scattered over the sand around my feet: piles of cigarette butts; napkins, plastic cups, and straws from the food trucks that shuttered and drove away at 4:30 p.m. In front of me, a row of green plastic trash bins overflows with the detritus of the day. Read More

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After a few days of dodging incessant traffic and fighting pedestrians on cramped sidewalks on the island of Malta, I was in need of some serenity, so I hopped over to Gozo for the day. I felt the shift the moment I stepped off the ferry. Rather than breezes saturated with the smell of stale beer, on Gozo the air was sweet and fresh. Instead of drunks staggering around in the wee hours, tourists on Gozo had flocked to sidewalk cafes to enjoy breakfast and cappuccino in the brilliant morning sunshine.

Sidewalk Cafe in Victoria, the capital of Gozo in the Maltese Islands

Sidewalk Cafe in Victoria, the capital of Gozo in the Maltese Islands

Our van made its way around the island as tour guide, Terry Spiteri, entertained us with stories about Gozitan culture and local traditions.

“Keep your eyes peeled for houses with keys in the front door. This is a long-standing tradition on Gozo. Some say it began during World War II, when the men were away from home fighting for long periods of time. Wives left the keys in the door so that husbands could come home any time of the day or night. Others insist that the women took lovers because the men were away so much, and the key was left in the lock so their paramours could enter as soon as their husbands returned to the battlefield.” Read More

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Nothing defines the culture on the Maltese Islands more than religion. Life revolves around the neighborhood Catholic churches and once a year, a massive feast is held to honor the patron saint of each church. Festivities start in the spring, and throughout the spring, summer, and fall, there is a feast nearly every weekend, somewhere on the islands.

The entire town turns out for the Feast of St. Publius in Florian, on the islamd of Malta

The entire town turns out for the Feast of St. Publius in Florian, on the islamd of Malta

During my visit, the Feast of St. Publius was scheduled in Floriana, the city adjacent to Malta‘s capital of Valletta. On Sunday morning, I hopped a bus to Floriana, arriving early in the afternoon, before any of the official activities had begun. Huge red pennants, elaborately embroidered in gold, hung above every street, marking the route of the parade that would step off later in the afternoon. Families clustered around tall tables set out in the streets, sipping espresso and snacking on appetizers, while men congregated at the tabernas. Read More

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Rocks, rocks, and more rocks. Everywhere I looked, Malta’s indigenous wheat-colored limestone dominated the landscape. Roads, houses, hospitals, government buildings, shops, and forts were crafted from the monotonous sedimentary rock, as if the island had regurgitated its innards into piles that masons crafted into structures on the spot.

Market Street, one of the two main streets in Valletta, the capital of Malta

Market Street, one of the two main streets in Valletta, the capital of Malta

I was puzzled by the poor condition of many buildings. Edges of the blocks were eroding and pock marks were wearing into the face of the unsealed limestone. Wooden balconies slumped from the facade, in imminent danger of collapse. But as I toured the cities and countryside of Malta, a historic view emerged that reversed my initial impression.

The earliest structures to be built of the endemic stone were pre-Bronze Age temples and underground sanctuaries. After several hundred years under Phoenician and Carthaginian rule, for which there is no remaining architectural record, the Romans arrived in 218 BC. For 1,100 years they embellished buildings with cornices, columns, and decorative tablets, and filled their homes with statuary, all carved from the local limestone. Read More

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The questions started the moment I announced I was fleeing corporate life to travel the world. It’s dangerous out there; aren’t you worried about traveling alone? How will you stay in touch? And how will you support yourself? I wasn’t afraid and knew I would be able to stay in touch, but I had no answers regarding income. I just knew that I’d dreamed of being a travel writer and photographer since childhood, and I couldn’t let one more day pass without attempting to make that dream come true.

Nearly eight years later, I’ve managed to achieve my goal, and the longer I’m at this, the more people want to know how I do it. For most, the question of money is at the top of the list. It’s a question over which all travel bloggers struggle. People are always surprised to learn that our blogs are not a major source of income. Instead, we’ve tapped into other talents and experience to earn the money needed to support our travels and our blogs. We run tour companies; consult in public relations, internet security, and social media; are public speakers; design websites and apps; and are technical writers; all jobs that can be done anywhere in the world that offers reliable Internet access. But far and away, the most popular means of earning money while traveling is by teaching English.

Intermediate English class at ElanGuest English Language School

Intermediate English class at ElanGuest English Language School

While I’ve never considered teaching English, when ElanGuest English Language School in Malta invited me to visit their school, I realized it would be an opportunity to provide readers with a behind-the-scenes look at teaching English as a second language (ESL). The three tiny specs in the middle of the Mediterranean Sea that comprise the Maltese Islands are among the world’s most popular destinations for learning English. Along with Maltese, English is an official language of Malta and most residents speak it fluently. Read More

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In 1693, an earthquake decimated eight towns in an area known as Vall di Noto in southeast Sicily. In some cases, the damage was so severe that the original towns could not be rescued. It was decided that one of these, Noto, would be rebuilt five miles closer to the sea, at the foot of the Iblean Mountains. The Catholic Church, which by that time had decreed that paintings and sculptures should be designed in a way that would speak to the illiterate, saw the reconstruction of Noto as a unique opportunity to design and build a town from scratch. The top planners of the day mapped out streets that crossed each other either at right angles, while architects designed private and public buildings embellished with beautiful ornamentation that later came to be known as Baroque.

Ferdinandea Gate is the entrance to the city of Noto, and the beginning of Corso Vittorio Emanuele, the main avenue in the town

Ferdinandea Gate is the entrance to the city of Noto, and the beginning of Corso Vittorio Emanuele, the main avenue in the town

Today, a stroll down Via Vittorio Emanuele, the main street in Noto, leads visitors past churches, government buildings, palaces, fountains, statues, and theaters, all studded with an orgy of cherubs, grotesquely grinning masks, marble columns, wrought-iron balconies, and belfrys. The buildings were constructed of a soft, honey-color tufa stone that absorbs the brilliant Sicilian sun throughout the day and emits it at sunset. With stone blocks decorated in leaves, flowers, fish scales, and shells, the effect is one of a giant golden wedding cake. Read More