Help Build Wells in Haiti - Passports with Purpose 2012

Passports with Purpose 2012 Fundraiser – Win Great Prizes and Help Build Wells in Haiti

This entry is part 4 of 4 in the series Passports with Purpose
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As I travel in developing countries around the world, I am often confronted by the lack of basic necessities that we take for granted in the United States. With each visit to Nepal I am reminded how difficult life is for residents of rural villages who walk miles each day, carrying large steel jugs of water on their shoulders for the needs of the family and their livestock. Children often miss out on education because their human labor is more important to the family’s survival than hours spent in a school.

Family collecting water in Haiti, courtesy of Water.org and Passports with Purpose

Family collecting water in Haiti, courtesy of Water.org and Passports with Purpose

Being regularly exposed to these living conditions tends to deaden the shock while I’m on the road but each time I return to the U.S. and turn on a tap or bend over a drinking fountain for the first time and can safely drink the water, the reality socks me in the gut. That’s why I’m especially delighted that this year, Passports with Purpose, the annual fundraising effort supported by travel bloggers, will be raising $100,000 to build wells in Haiti, where nearly half of the people don’t have a nearby source of clean water. PwP is working in tandem with Water.org, in my opinion one of the best charities in the world. Nicole Wickenhauser, a Senior Development Manager with the organization, explains the depth of the problem:

Men, women and children living in Port-au-Prince gather their water each day by walking to a nearby water tank (filled sporadically by water trucks) and filling up a five-gallon-jug which they then carry back to their homes. This is typically the only water they have for the whole day, for all of their needs: drinking, bathing, cooking, laundry, cleaning, etc. Often, it’s contaminated. In the surrounding villages where Water.org works, the situation is no better. People walk miles or wait in long lines for unreliable water which is often not safe.”

Passports with Purpose is a unique effort, in that we don’t just ask you to make a monetary donation. Travel bloggers solicit sponsors to donate prizes that are then raffled off. Each $10 you donate buys one entry in the raffle for the prize you select. And the prizes are pretty darn fantastic, ranging from country tours to stays in luxury hotels, to top of the line travel gear. Check out this year’s catalog of prizes here. See more than one prize you’d like to bid on? No problem. You can donate any amount you like, in increments of $10, and spread your votes around. Voting starts today and runs through December 11th, and you can track our progress toward the goal on the widget in the sidebar of my blog, which will display how much we’ve collected so far. Best of all, EVERY CENT GOES TO WATER.ORG. The founders of Passports with Purpose organize this effort each year out of the goodness of their hearts and donate all their time.

Passports with Purpose's 2012 goal is to raise $100,000 to build two wells in Haiti

Passports with Purpose’s 2012 goal is to raise $100,000 to build two wells in Haiti

Lest you think there’s little possibility of winning, let me share a little secret with you. Last year I donated $200 and chose two prizes, casting 10 votes ($100) for each. I won a nine-day tour of Costa Rica with GAdventures! The next time you turn on the tap and drink down a long,cool glass of crystal clean water, think about how lucky you are, and if you can spare $10 I encourage you to join me in supporting this year’s fundraiser with Passports with Purpose.

Series NavigationHelp Passports with Purpose 2011 Build Libraries in Zambia That Will Teach Kids to Read

14 Comments on “Passports with Purpose 2012 Fundraiser – Win Great Prizes and Help Build Wells in Haiti

  1. What an awful article!

    Relax, I’m kidding, balancing the positive feedbacks.

    I’m from India and I know how difficult it is the social security here. donation is a good thing to uplift the social structure a bit, especially in the rural areas of Nepal, Bhutan and other countries where things are awfully pathetic.

    Passport with purpose! catchy and noble purpose..

    You can also do voluntary work for some social communities, but before that ask them to break down the money how they are using it. This way you can sure you money goes to a good cause, and not in the pocket of rich tour operators.

    I’ve experienced that many people feel ashamed to ask money, there is no point because you are asking donation for a good reason.

  2. Wow, this sounds really great. I’ve never been to Haiti, but I do know that water.org does a lot of great things. I like the idea of raffling off prizes!

    • Thanks Laurence. Looks like we’ve started out gangbusters – already raised $15,000 in the first three days. Fingers crossed we hit our goal.

  3. Great post, Barbara. I’m also pleased to be participating in Passports with Purpose on both of my blogs. If you like horseback riding, or simply hiking, golfing or visiting the spa in Arizona, you might want to check out my donation from Rancho de los Caballeros. A steal for $10.

    Keep up the good work!

    • Thanks Nancy – hope you’re recovering well after your hip surgery.

  4. I, too, greatly admire water.org. Surely water is the most priceless and basic of gifts to give the world that struggles to get a supply of clean water.

  5. Beautiful and touching article. i think traveling to different part of the world makes us appreciate what we have. we tend to take things for granted here in the USA or Europe, but sometimes going solo or in group will help us not only appreciate what we have, but also extend our hands to help the needy people.

    • Thank you, Exploring Morocco – I couldn’t have said it any better!

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